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Q&A with District 622 School Board incumbent Nancy Livingston

Nancy Livingston

• Age: 67

• City of residence: North St. Paul

• Years lived in district: 38

• Education: Bachelor's degree, University of Minnesota

• Occupation: Committee administrator, Minnesota Senate Education Committee

• Notable community and civic involvement: Incumbent candidate for North St. Paul-Maplewood-Oakdale School Board, District 622 Board member since 2000, Intermediate School District 916 Board member, North St. Paul-Maplewood-Oakdale Rotary Club member

Why are you running for this office?

There is no more important work than supporting our public schools. Public education is what lifts people out of poverty and gives them the opportunity to become productive citizens. Our country's future depends on having educated citizens.

What are the biggest issues in District 622 for residents living in Woodbury?

We need to prepare students for college and work. We need to maintain class sizes, support struggling learners and provide additional opportunities for advanced students. Our goal is to become a destination district that people proudly support.

How do you plan to address these issues if elected?

We need to continue to work together as a school board in partnership with our community stakeholders. We are refining our district's strategic plan, and we need to work that plan. I also think we need to step up our communication with the community and create events that bring people into the schools. We are serving people of all ages, and the community needs to hear that story.

What distinguishes you from the other candidates?

My background in communication and education. I was a newspaper reporter for the Pioneer Press for 25 years. I worked for Century College for 13 years and currently work for the Minnesota Senate. I have a passion for government transparency and accountability. As a District 622 School Board member, I have helped build bridges between E-12 and higher education.

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