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Let your voices be heard: Woodbury sends out community survey seeking resident’s feedback

Woodbury

Some Woodbury residents will have an opportunity to share their thoughts with city leaders.

Every two years, the City of Woodbury mails surveys to residents asking them to rate city services and quality of life. This week, the city is sending out the 30-question surveys to 1,500 randomly selected residents.

The feedback city leaders glean from the questionnaires allows them to determine whether they're meeting people's expectations and identify areas of improvement.

The survey asks residents to rate elected city officials, safety and other municipal services. It also includes questions regarding specific projects, such as the proposed Gold Line bus-rapid transit line, which would run along Bielenberg Drive and connect Woodbury to downtown St. Paul.

"It definitely helps the city of Woodbury and more importantly our city council," said Jonathan Williams-Kinsel, an assistant to the city administrator. "It's a way residents can include themselves in the civic process."

Typically, the city nets a 30 to 40 percent response rate from residents asked to take the survey. Although valid for statistical purposes, Williams-Kinsel said more participation would yield better results, especially for identifying trends.

That's because the results are used to inform which areas of planning city leaders should explore, he added.

The most recent community survey helped city officials identify three initiatives related to sustainability, parks and trails, and community inclusion efforts.

The results will also inform the city on how it met these initiatives, Williams-Kinsel said.

The National Research Center, a Colorado-based polling firm, is partnering with the city and will compare Woodbury's results with 70 other cities across the country. Woodbury will also compare itself against 40 other Minnesota cities.

Sample questions include how residents rate elected city officials, safety and other municipal services.

Williams-Kinsel said results will likely be presented to the city council this spring.

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