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Public Works building expansion gets the nod

WOODBURY — Public Works is getting a much-desired makeover.

During its April 4 meeting, the Woodbury City Council approved the amended conditional-use permit and site-and-building plan for the city's Public Works building expansion with a 7-0 vote.

The plan to expand the two buildings at 2300 and 2301 Tower Drive includes approval of a new fleet service building, cold storage, relocation of fuel facilities, updating exterior stories and the expansion of the existing main building.

"I think it's a really important project. It'll allow us to house all of our equipment — and that's worth a lot of money — and house it properly," Council member Amy Scoggins said. "Hopefully this allows us to consolidate more equipment."

According to Community Development Director Dwight Picha, the original building was built in 1967, with additions coming in 1975 and 1986 before the property was expanded to the east of Tower Drive in 1992. The expansion was added onto in 2004.

During the Council's Jan. 17 workshop meeting, the estimated project costs was set at $20,435,000. Contributions from the South Washington Watershed District and Washington County were being negotiated.

Construction is scheduled to begin in June, with substantial completion set for late summer 2019.

The site plan for the 2300 building will be to remove the main building in three separate time frames to be replaced by a fleet services building of 32,000 square feet.

Behind that, a cold storage building approximately 18,000 square feet would be built with a future covered cold storage area added to the north of the site. At 2301, a 35,000-square-foot warm storage building would be built along with a 8,000-square-foot division shop. There would also be minor additions to the office and main entrance as well as building additional offices and conference rooms

Proposed landscaping has 146 new trees and 472 shrubs to replace removed plants as well as provide screening for the neighborhood.

"The city now has over a billion dollars worth of infrastructure in the city," Public Works Director Klayton Eckles said. "So your sewer, your water, your roadway systems, your signals ... that's a gigantic investment. Woodbury's a very big city now and we have a huge amount of equipment that's used to maintain, operate and take care of all that infrastructure and a good-sized staff as well. We want that staff to be efficient in delivering our services in taking care of that infrastructure.

"This facility will do that. We have millions of dollars of high-tech equipment and we want it to last as long as possible."

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