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Why we Relay

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Why do we Relay? For a survivor. For a cure. 

Relay For Life South Washington County is holding its annual all-night vigil at East Ridge High School tonight. 

The purpose is to encourage survivors and to inspire giving to an organization that supports research for a cure for cancer.

"Doing nothing is not an option," said Dave Olson, organizer of the event.

Speakers used words like love, hope, cope, and cure as thousands of people organized at the football field, lighted luminaria in honor of survivors or in remembrance of those they've lost, and walked the track together. 

They raised money for the American Cancer Society.

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