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Republican Andrea Kieffer of Woodbury responds to a question at a Tuesday legislative forum in Stillwater. She is a candidate in House District 56B, which includes most of Woodbury.
Republican Andrea Kieffer of Woodbury responds to a question at a Tuesday legislative forum in Stillwater. She is a candidate in House District 56B, which includes most of Woodbury.

Tyler's Law clears House on unanimous vote

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news Woodbury, 55125

Woodbury Minnesota 8420 City Centre Drive 55125

A bill that would require drivers to have a full understanding of carbon monoxide dangers before receiving their driver's license received unanimous support Thursday from the Minnesota House.

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Lawmakers passed the bill - dubbed "Tyler's Law" for Tyler Lavers, a Woodbury man who died last year from carbon monoxide poisoning - on a 131-0 vote.

The bill now awaits action in the Senate. The bill's chief House sponsor, Rep. Andrea Kieffer, R-Woodbury, said she expects senators to consider the bill today or tomorrow - after larger pieces of comprehensive legislation are passed.

"I think it'll pass," Kieffer said of Tyler's Law's chances in the Senate.

Tyler's Law calls for driver training instruction to include information on carbon monoxide dangers and requires a carbon monoxide-related question to be added to the Minnesota driver's license exam.

"Today is a step in the right direction for Minnesota," Kieffer said through a press release after House members passed the bill.

This is the final weekend for lawmakers to finish their work in time for Tuesday's constitutionally mandated deadline. So far, leaders from the Republican-controlled Legislature and Gov. Mark Dayton have not reached an agreement on overall state budget.

Kieffer said agreement may be at hand on the education portion of the budget, but declined to speculate on the likelihood of other budgetary items being solved.

If lawmakers and Dayton don't reach a budget agreement in time for Tuesday's adjournment, the governor can call legislators back for a special session.

Kieffer said she's bracing for that possibility.

"I haven't made any vacation plans," she said.

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